Kenyan flag from Wikimedia Commons

Poly Fashions — a Kenyan Poly Awareness Project

Hi folks!

I’m still working on the next installment in the 5 ways to meet poly/open people series.  I’ve got some things happening in the “real world” that are interfering with my writing time. Sorry!  In the meantime, I wanted to let you know of this very interesting project happening in Kenya.

Fellow Poly Leadership Network member Alfred Anangwe sent the message below earlier today:

Recently, Kenya’s president signed into law a marriage bill which among other things encourages men to marry many wives without seeking consent from their spouses. There has been little opposition to this. What is disturbing, though, is that when a Kenyan woman tried to get married to two men through consent last year, there was public outrage that led to the split of their ‘marriage’. There are a number of internet sites (some listed below) where you can read about this story.

1.       Should two men be allowed to ‘marry’ the same woman?

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/the-hot-button/two-kenyan-men-reach-deal-to-marry-the-same-woman/article13979164/

2.       Kenyan love rivals agree to ‘marry’ the same woman after she refused to choose between them after having affairs with both:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2402299/Kenyan-love-rivals-agree-marry-woman-refused-choose-them.html

Public outrage was so harsh that most women and men who were in similar arrangements went underground. Poly fashions is a Kenyan project which is encouraging such unions to come out openly since there is no law in Kenya which proscribes polyandry. We call on PLN members elsewhere to support our first planned national awareness project that among other things seeks to print awareness t-shirts, engage the media, develop a Kenyan website and stage workshop to train regional leaders on issues of advocacy and awareness…. Further queries can be directed to Alfred Anangwe (aanangwe@yahoo.com) who is also a PLN member or Everlyne Makana (wemakana@gmail.com). Cheers.

I have asked Alfred about possibly carrying some of their designs in my LoveOTB Zazzle store. (I’ll let you know when/if they become available!) If you’re interested in getting involved, I’m sure Alfred and Everlyne would welcome your inquiries.

Because no matter who or how many you love…. Love is ALWAYS ok!

~♥ Dawn

PS: Check out the fun options already in my LoveOTB Zazzle store!

 

∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥ ∞ ♥

[© 2014 Dawn M. Davidson]

2 thoughts on “Poly Fashions — a Kenyan Poly Awareness Project

  1. Auros

    It seems a little off-target, to me, to classify multiple marriage (whether the patriarchal polygyny, or what this article was about) in a culture that different from ours in with “polyamory”. Certainly it’s a form of consensual non-monogamy, but poly culture doesn’t even encompass all of the consensual non-monogamists in the US / the West. There are plenty of people who are CNM without being poly. (Swingers, the monogamish folks who allow for threesomes or flings but explicitly try to avoid loving relationships, etc.) This instance of polyandry looks more-similar to poly as we know and love it than the legal polygyny in their country, but I suspect if you interviewed the participants you’d find that their understanding of the relationship was quite different in many ways from how American or European polyamorists think about love, sex, and partnerships / marriages.

    Totally agree with the idea that their rights should be supported and their relationship shouldn’t be stigmatized, but there’s something that feels a little culturally-imperialist about imposing our labels on their relationship.

    Reply
    1. Uncharted Love / Love Outside the Box Post author

      Actually, Auros, this project came from within their culture, and was not “us” “imposing our labels on their relationship.” The folks running the project — who are IN Kenya — applied for membership in the Poly Leadership Network, and posted this project of theirs to that network asking for help. I decided to help by getting the word out. I can understand your concern, but it’s misplaced.

      Reply

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